Careers

Published on February 19th, 2020 | by Nikki Pham

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The Simplest Ways to Make the Best of Psychometric Tests

Psychometric Tests are a tricky challenge and one you’ll likely have to overcome at some point in your life. Competitive early career programmes like summer internships, industrial placements or graduate schemes at huge, established global firms are the dreams of many ambitious students and new graduates. However, no matter how skilled, switched on and intelligent of an individual you are, it seems to be a dead end with the online assessment stage as you are unable to proceed further to interviews; to finally meet your potential future manager or mentor and show them how special you are. Here are a few ways to minimise this frustration by making the best of Psychometric Tests.

Photo by Maarten van den Heuvel on Unsplash

Reflect on your suitability and priorities

Everyone has dream jobs, jobs they will be good at (these two can be the same) and other ‘not-to-bad’ options. Completing Psychometric Tests can get very time-consuming as well as mentally and physically draining; therefore, getting a bit methodical about things can help! Reflect on the type of work that aligns with your abilities, values and skills, make a list of roles that are your top priorities, another for roles that you would not normally consider but can be good at and finally some other additional options for backup. Now work backwards, or start doing online assessments for jobs that are your least favourite first, as a way to practice (besides your actual FREE test practice sessions) and to learn from unsuccessful attempts. This will not only save your time and unnecessary disappointment, but will also increase your chance of securing a space at the right entry-level programme.

Research on your job function and industry

A deeper understanding of what your responsibilities are in a chosen career or industry, whether from desk research or from speaking to people working in similar areas, is absolutely essential. Do your homework, then compare the information you have found with the goals and requirements of any Aptitude Test you would need to take to figure out your best route forward; for instance, the different skills and attributes to emphasise or demonstrate in a certain type of tests, or whether speed or accuracy is more important in various scenarios. Furthermore, knowledge of which tests and publishers are most used in your industry or job role, has proven to be valuable; as this has helped many candidates practice hard AND smart to achieve solid results.

Learn a new skill: test-taking

As highlighted earlier, being an amazing, out-of-this-world candidate with all the skills and abilities any employer could ever ask for, is not enough. With Psychometric Tests, or Aptitude Tests, test-taking is another skill you need to master to compete against hundreds, sometimes thousands of other also ‘perfect’ applicants. Practice regularly, using the right resources, in as-real-as-possible exam conditions and time yourself strictly, though sound cliche, are the best tricks to ace psychometric assessments. Moreover, as your results usually are not scored against a standard passing point, but against other people’s performances, avoid being complacent so that you make fewer careless mistakes, but also, this is not a time to be too humble. Get competitive, be confident, trust your ability, these are all important parts of test-taking, as a skill, as they will help eliminate your anxiety and insecurity; and voila, you are ready to get one step closer to the career of your dream.

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About the Author

I'm studying an MA in Creative Enterprise in Cardiff. In my spare time I love writing, particularly in the space of business and enterprise.



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